Chasing gobblers in south-central Ontario

Spring Turkey Hunting in Brant County, Ontario

It's an early morning in April, opening day of wild turkey season in Ontario, and I'm sitting motionless at the base of an old oak tree listening to the woods of Brant County come to life. Before the sun crests the horizon, the unmistakable gobble of a wild turkey slices through the cool morning air. Instantly my heart is in my throat. Game on.

Brant Background

Brant County occupies 850 square kilometres of primarily rural land in south-central Ontario. Surrounding the City of Brantford, Brant County offers an ideal mix of services for visiting hunters and prime habitat for wild turkeys.

With the Grand River bisecting the county, a combination of rolling hills, river valleys, mature woodlots, farmed fields, grasslands, and treed fence lines create a utopia for turkeys and turkey hunters alike.

field in brant county ontario
(Photo credit: Ben Beattie)

Pre-hunt Plan

Turkeys are widespread here and a few days before opening day, my hunting partners and I scout by driving rural areas with binoculars, looking for birds. When the crops are low in the spring the dark silhouette of a turkey really stands out.

Most of Brant County is private property. After we spot several turkeys along the edge of a field, adjacent to a woodlot, we find the landowner and secure permission to hunt his land.

On With the Hunt

We spent the remaining time before the opener scouting the land. We located tracks, droppings, and scratching areas where turkeys had been feeding. We also spotted the flock of turkeys we saw the previous day. They were nearly in the same location, along the edge of the bush, feeding in a cut cornfield. The unmistakable shape of a tom turkey in full strut gets us even more excited for opening morning.

We watched the flock until dusk when they flew up to roost in a stand of mature trees near the field's edge. Knowing where they are roosting provides valuable information about where to set up the next morning.

hunter with harvested turkey
(Photo credit: Ben Beattie)

Turkeys rarely fly very far when they drop down from the roost, so before first light on opening morning, we set up about 100 yards from where we watched the turkeys roost. After hearing a gobble cut through the morning air, we wait a few more minutes as turkeys pitch down, one after another, from the roosting trees to the field. Suddenly, there are half a dozen birds coming towards our decoys.

Three hens and two jakes lead the way while a large tom follows closely behind. I shake with anticipation as I raise my gun. When the tom struts to within 20 yards, I take aim, ease off the safety and squeeze the trigger. Game over.

Whether you're an avid turkey hunter or are just getting started, Brant County provides everything a turkey hunter needs for a successful hunt. Places to stay, eat, shop, and hunt are all in close range in this turkey hunter's paradise.

About Ben Beattie

Ben is a guide on Lac Seul and area waterways in northwestern Ontario. Raised near London in southwestern Ontario, he earned a degree in environmental science at the University of Waterloo. Pike, walleye, and lake trout are among his favourites, but muskie fishing is his biggest passion. He's also an avid turkey, whitetail, and moose hunter.

Recommended Articles

Moose Hunting in Ontario

Ontario is one of the best places to fulfill the dream.

Crossing the Border into Canada

How to legally bring your hunting rifle into Canada.

Big Bears

Spring Hunting for Bear in Northern Ontario

Remote Shoreline Moose Hunting

A fly-in moose hunting adventure at Winoga Lodge in Sioux Lookout.

Becoming a Trapper

What you need to know and consider before you become licensed.

Techniques for an Ontario Moose Hunt

Popular methods to use on a big game hunt.

Deer Hunting in Sunset Country

An overview of deer hunting in Northwestern Ontario—and what the future holds

A Heritage Hunt

Duck Hunting on Long Point Bay

Turkey Time

Shaking Off the Cabin Fever

A Duck Hunting Bonanza

Duck Hunting on Tthe mouth of the Thames River.

Father and Son Fly-in Moose Hunt

Scott Smith and his son visit Wilerness North in Ontario's Sunset Country

Hunting Water for Moose

A Thrilling Way to Fill a Tag in Ontario

Where Big Bucks Roam

Ontario's Sunset Country is a Hidden Gem

Trail Camera 101

A Few Things to Consider When Using a Trail Cam

Spring Scouting

Making the Difference in the Upcoming Season

Understanding the Rut

Simple tactics for a successful deer hunt.

Hunt the Grass

Prime opportunities to take bruins in fields, big grass openings and cut overs.

Big Woods & Storied Bucks

Whitetail Deer in Eastern Ontario

The Beauty of Blinds

Concealing Ourselves from Whitetail Deer

A First-Time Bear Hunter Visits Watson's Kaby Lodge

Ty Sjodin brings niece Kalie to Algoma Country for her shot at a fall black bear